SitOnMyFace

Kaela.
21.
Senior at ND.
Born&Raised in Boston <3.
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  1. "When someone is crying, of course, the noble thing to do is to comfort them. But if someone is trying to hide their tears, it may also be noble to pretend you do not notice them."
    — Lemony Snicket (via fairestregal)
     
     
  2. (Source: changotx)

     
     
  3. (Source: ethereal-sleep)

     
     
  4. (Source: skinnymeanwoman)

     
     
  5. validx2:

    When the cashier hold’s up your $20 to see if it’s real

    image

     
     
  6. portraits-of-america:

     “My mother is Japanese and my father is American. I only just recently reconciled these identities. In middle school, my Asian-ness was a quirky thing about me. I made Asian jokes about myself so my white peers would accept me, making a caricature of myself as the ‘Asian person’. At the time it was really important for me to connect with people who had the same cultural characteristics as myself, but I couldn’t find anybody. So, I tokenized my Asian identity.     “Later, I realized that making my Asian-ness a central part of my identity was harmful—there were so many other facets of myself that didn’t have to do with that. It affected how people interacted with me: when I earned a good grade, people would say, ‘Of course, you’re Asian.’     “I then decided to go to the opposite end and shun my Japanese heritage by pretending I was white. That was my strategy for a few years. Without even realizing it, I internalized certain racisms against Asian people. I saw them as inferior, which made me want to identify with my ‘white’ self even more.     “Finally, last semester I went to a giant cultural celebration for people of color. I saw a Japanese Taiko performance, which made me think of when I was a kid going to Japanese festivals—I would be so excited about everything Japanese. I almost cried and realized that I love a lot of Japanese culture, and that it was a part of who I am. I needed to revisit how I thought about my racial and cultural identity: what it was that I felt, why I felt it, and how I wanted to identify myself from that point on. I went back to Japan for a month and fell in love with the culture again. That was very important, because I shunned it for so long.     “So after a lot of processing this summer, I realize that I am in peculiar place between being a person of color and being white: I have too many privileges to identify as a person of color, yet I’m not white because of the way people label me as Asian and the shame I experienced as being Asian and Japanese. It’s a unique experience, being Japanese-American, and it’s important to know that this is who I am—no matter how people label me.” 
Oberlin, OH

    portraits-of-america:

         “My mother is Japanese and my father is American. I only just recently reconciled these identities. In middle school, my Asian-ness was a quirky thing about me. I made Asian jokes about myself so my white peers would accept me, making a caricature of myself as the ‘Asian person’. At the time it was really important for me to connect with people who had the same cultural characteristics as myself, but I couldn’t find anybody. So, I tokenized my Asian identity.
         “Later, I realized that making my Asian-ness a central part of my identity was harmful—there were so many other facets of myself that didn’t have to do with that. It affected how people interacted with me: when I earned a good grade, people would say, ‘Of course, you’re Asian.’
         “I then decided to go to the opposite end and shun my Japanese heritage by pretending I was white. That was my strategy for a few years. Without even realizing it, I internalized certain racisms against Asian people. I saw them as inferior, which made me want to identify with my ‘white’ self even more.
         “Finally, last semester I went to a giant cultural celebration for people of color. I saw a Japanese Taiko performance, which made me think of when I was a kid going to Japanese festivals—I would be so excited about everything Japanese. I almost cried and realized that I love a lot of Japanese culture, and that it was a part of who I am. I needed to revisit how I thought about my racial and cultural identity: what it was that I felt, why I felt it, and how I wanted to identify myself from that point on. I went back to Japan for a month and fell in love with the culture again. That was very important, because I shunned it for so long.
         “So after a lot of processing this summer, I realize that I am in peculiar place between being a person of color and being white: I have too many privileges to identify as a person of color, yet I’m not white because of the way people label me as Asian and the shame I experienced as being Asian and Japanese. It’s a unique experience, being Japanese-American, and it’s important to know that this is who I am—no matter how people label me.” 

    Oberlin, OH

     
     
  7. the-gingerdancer:

i feel like this is a real family photo

    the-gingerdancer:

    i feel like this is a real family photo

     
     
  8.  
     
  9. katara:

    seattl-ite:

    katara:

    I am sick of people thinking deodorant is optional

    i’m sick of people thinking that they can judge others on a normal bodily function and that the only way they can be accepted is to wear something that is harmful/poisonous to your body. just because some men in the 1880’s decided bodily odor was no longer acceptable. 

    bitch you stink 

     
     
  10. thedarkkonoha:

too risky

    thedarkkonoha:

    too risky

     
     
  11. h0ppip:

    "hey aren’t you too old for Poké…”

    image

     
     
  12. done:

    with your shit

     
     
  13. mydollyaviana:

    Disney/Pixar miniature photoshoots by Kurt Moses

     
     
  14. cindehella:

    cinematic masterpiece

     
     
  15. babygotbackandsomechickennuggets:

    when you go to a friends house and their pet sits next you 

    image